Revolutionary Councils

1970 /

„To prevent a misunderstanding that might easily occur today, I must say that the communes of hippies and drop-outs have nothing to do with this (…). Politically, they are meaningless. The councils desire the exact opposite, even if they begin very small – as neighborhood councils, professional councils, councils within factories, apartment houses and so on (…). The councils say: we want to participate, we want to debate, we want to make our own voices heard in public, and we want to have a possibility to determine the political course of our country. Since the country is too big for all of us to come together and determine our fate, we need a number of public spaces within it. The booth in which we deposit our ballot is unquestionably too small, for this has room only for one. The parties are completely unsuitable; there we are, most of us, nothing but the manipulated electorate. But if only ten of us are sitting around a table, each expressing his opinion, each hearing the opinion of others, then a rational formation of opinions can take place through the exchange of opinions. There, too, it will become clear which one of us is best suited to present our view before the next higher level, where in turn our view will be clarified through the influence of other views, revised, or proved wrong (…). A council-state of this sort, to which the principle of sovereignty would be wholly alien, would be admiringly suited to federations of the most various kinds, especially since in it, power would be constituted horizontally and not vertically. But if you ask me now what prospect it has of being realized, than I must say to you: very slight, if at all. And yet perhaps, after all – in the wake of the next revolution.“

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Revolutionary Councils